Bolsey Jubilee

As with most Bolsey cameras, such as the B2 and Model C, the Jubilee maintains a strong family resemblance. It is, for better or worse, the most technologically advanced of the bunch and was manufactured during the last year of Bolsey’s existence. Like its brethren, the Jubilee has the Set-o-Matic light metering system, which worked very well….

Haking Halina 35X

The Halina 35X, manufactured in Hong Kong by Haking starting in 1959 is an attractive 35mm viewfinder with a small form factor. Also known as the Micronta 35X, it is a solidly built, and heavy, camera. The camera was a bit old-fashioned for its time in that the film was wound separately from cocking the…

Ensign Ful-Vue

The Ensign Ful-Vue TLR is a very simple camera to operate. However, if certain precautions are taken, decent results are possible. This camera has been a favorite of mine from the first time I saw one in the pages of McKeown’s. It took some time to locate a beautiful example at a reasonable price. After replacing…

Kodak Retina IIa (type 016)

Visually, this Kodak Retina IIa (type 016), is a little crunchy. However, the mechanical components are near perfect. This sturdy 35mm folding rangefinder typifies what I like about the Retina lineup and why I have a mini-collection within my collection for these beauties. Make Kodak Model Retina IIa type 016 Year 1951-1954 Format 35mm Shutter…

Whittaker Micro 16

Produced between 1946 and 1950 by the William R. Whittaker Co. Ltd, in Los Angeles, California the Micro 16 is smaller than a pack of cigarettes. It was popular with some police forces of the era. The film is advanced by the normally recessed plunger on the side of the camera, the operation of which…

Kodak Stereo Camera

The Kodak Stereo Camera surprised me, compared to the lightweight and somewhat flimsy design of the Graflex Stereo Graphic, it feels robust and substantial in hand. It appears easy to use, with self-cocking shutter, smooth focus, and spirit level. Make Kodak Model Stereo Year 1954 Format 35mm Shutter Kodak Speed B,25,50,100,200 Lens Kodak Anaston  f3.5…

Q.R.S Kamra

The 1928 Q.R.S Kamra is an attractive bakelite model based on the slightly earlier, and larger, Ellison camera of the same name. This example and most others are missing the crank which both advances the film and fires the shutter. Though it takes approximately forty 24x32mm exposures on 35mm film, it has to be loaded…

No. 1 Folding Pocket Kodak (1899)

This is the oldest camera in my collection, so far. The No. 1 Folding Pocket Kodak was a milestone in portable photography. Though large by todays pocketable standards, it was a breakthough for it’s time with its light weight, daylight roll loadable, and well-engineered strut design. Make Kodak Model No. 1 Folding Pocket Kodak Year…

Bolsey Model C

The Bolsey Model C, manufactured in the US between 1950 and 1956, is a diminutive 35mm TLR. The chassis is a modified version of that found on the Bolsey B2, or Jubilee, with the larger upper housing incorporating the coupled-rangefinder mechanism. As with most Bolsey cameras build quality is adequate to good. The focus tab has…

Zeiss Ikon Contessa (533/24)

This camera has been unused and in storage since the late 1950’s, the last still camera of a photographer father who passed away at a young age.  It is pristine, everything looks and functions as it did on the day it left the factory. Fit and finish is exceptional, even compared to my favorite Kodak…

Canon IIF2

This example of the Canon IIF2 is a recent arrival from Japan. It does not have the “E-P” mark associated with having been purchased by US servicemen. It is somewhat rare given that just over 2600 were manufactured. As well built as it is the IIF2 should not neccisarily be billed as A Leica copy,…

Ansco Vest Pocket no. 2(A)

After a fairly long hiatus due to moving, I will be posting cameras here on a regular basis. The Ansco VP no. 2(A) is one of the neatest cameras I have come across in a while. The action of its strut-folding mechanism made me smile the first time I used it and the overall attention…